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Bike JC Awarded 'Jersey City Green Award'

Thanks to the Jersey City Redevelopment Agency for recognizing the growing community of Jersey City cyclists, through this award to Bike JC.
 
Our esteemed co-honorees included Grove Street Bicycles and city planner Tanya Marione-Stanton, who is organizing the city's Adopt-a-Lot Community Garden Program. Seven of those gardens are on the route for the Community Garden Tour this weekend, starting at 11 am at Riverview-Fisk Park.
 
Other award winners included the newly recreated city Environmental Commission, with a board of appointees who have expertise in environmental engineering and consulting, among other fields; Garden State Urban Farms, which will be setting up a large hydroponic farm somewhere in the city (likely Greenville) soon, in partnership with the...

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Jersey City's First Permanent Bike Lane

Three and a half years after Bike JC formed to advocate for safe cycling throughout Jersey City, city workers striped the city's first permanent bike lane in white paint earlier this week on Grove Street.
 
A paint-over of the trial lane put down last year, the lane represents the first concrete infrastructure improvement for safe bicycling in the city. Three more miles of bike lanes will be painted this year on roads that are due for re-paving on last year's schedule.
 
The Grove Street lanes are short but sweet, running from the PATH station to Grand Street via the front of city hall. Often crowded by double-parked cars and trucks in one of the more congested areas of the city, the lanes are well situated for the practice of traffic law enforcement as well as...

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Footbridge to Liberty State Park Arrives

The new ped-bike bridge to Liberty State Park from Jersey Avenue has arrived. City engineers expect it to be fully in place by the end of May and are working feverishly towards Memorial Day.
 
Now that the bridge is here, workers have to place pilings that descend 90 feet into the mud and muck below the bridge, then place concrete support on top. Last comes the bridge, which is a full 10 feet wide, the same width as the wood planks of the previous bridge. Those planks were not all passable, and only 6 feet of the bridge was actually usable--that is, until it met its end during Hurricane Sandy.
 
Most of the funding for the replacement bridge comes from FEMA. Advocacy by local residents and groups such as Friends of Liberty State Park, in concert with city...

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